Caffeine Nation

On November 22, 2007, in Did you know?, by Tom

CaffeineSo I tried this new energy drink Verve, and the label said it had 80mg of caffeine. I got curious and decided to investigate how much caffeine other drinks (mainly soda) have. I discovered some things I didn’t expect: Pepsi One has more caffeine than Mountain Dew, and Diet Coke has more caffeine than Dr. Pepper which has more caffeine than regular Coke. A much more complete list can be found HERE.

Being the nerd that I am, I then went to WebMD and looked up caffeine. Here’s somethings I found:

“Caffeine exaggerates the stress response,” says James D. Lane, PhD, professor of medical psychology at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., and a long-time caffeine researcher. “At the cellular level, caffeine locks the receptor normally used by adenosine, a brain modulator that provides feedback to avoid overstimulation of nerve cells. If adenosine is locked up, nothing keeps the nervous system from getting too excited at a cellular level.”

So what’s the harm, ask caffeine fans, who point to studies showing the benefits of caffeine, such as boosting memory and improving concentration and perhaps lowering risks of diseases such as Alzheimer’s and liver cancer.

But others are alarmed by what they say is an increasingly overcaffeinated nation; they are concerned by studies finding too much caffeine can set you up for high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and decreased bone density — not to mention jangled nerves.

And some fun facts from another article:

Children’s consumption of soft drinks has doubled in the past 35 years, with sodas supplanting milk.

By triggering the release of adrenaline to help muscles work harder and longer, caffeine so clearly enhances athletic performance that until 2004 it was considered a controlled substance by the International Olympic Committee.

The young adult crowd who favor caffeine with their alcohol appear to be putting themselves at some risk, too. According to Mark Fillmore, a psychologist at the University of Kentucky, “Caffeine seems to restore the speed of your behavior but not the accuracy.” This gives a whole new meaning to “The Quick and the Dead!”

 

2 Responses to Caffeine Nation

  1. Rob Fahrni says:

    Tom,

    Maybe this explains some of my heightened stress levels lately. Too darned much caffeine! :-)

    Reply

  2. NK says:

    Tea, coffee, cola, energy drinks and chocolate share the same nerve toxin (stimulant), caffeine. Caffeine, which is readily released into the blood, triggers a powerful immune response that helps the body to counteract and eliminate this irritant. The toxic irritant stimulates the adrenal glands, and to some extent, the body’s many cells, to release the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol into the blood stream.

    If consumption of stimulants continues on a regular basis, however, this natural defense response of the body becomes overused and ineffective. The almost constant secretion of stress hormones, which are highly toxic compounds in and of themselves, eventually alters the blood chemistry and causes damage to the immune system, endocrine, and nervous systems. Future defense responses are weakened, and the body becomes more prone to infections and other ailments.

    The boost in energy experienced after drinking a cup of coffee is not a direct result of the caffeine it contains, but of the immune system’s attempt to get rid of it (caffeine) An overexcited and suppressed immune system fails to provide the “energizing” adrenaline and cortisol boost needed to free the body from the acidic nerve toxin, caffeine. At this stage, people say that they are “used” to a stimulant, such as coffee. So they tend to increase intake to feels the “benefits.”

    Since the body cells have to sacrifice some of their own water for the removal of the nerve toxin caffeine, regular consumption of coffee, tea, or colas causes them to become dehydrated. For every cup of tea or coffee you drink, the body has to mobilize 2-3 cups of water just to remove the stimulants, a luxury it cannot afford. This applies to soft drinks, medicinal drugs, and any other stimulants, As a rule, all stimulants have a strong dehydrating effect on the bile, blood, and digestive juices.

    Get the real scoop on caffeine at http://www.CaffeineAwareness.org
    Test your caffeine smarts with the caffeine quiz.

    And if you drink decaf you wont want to miss this special free report on the Dangers of Decaf available at http://www.soyfee.com

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>